The Multiverse Hypothesis Explained by Max Tegmark


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The Multiverse Hypothesis Explained by Max Tegmark

The Multiverse Hypothesis Explained by Max Tegmark

The multiverse hypothesis has attracted attention over the last few years but in actuality it’s a very old idea going back to the ancient Greeks where they imagined the concept of infinite worlds. However the multiverse hypothesis has been under scrutiny only in the time of modern physics.

Dr. Max Tegmark is a Swedish-American Physicist, Cosmologist, & Professor at MIT. He explains in detail the multiverse hypothesis. According to Max Tegmark, the multiverse is not just a staple of science fiction. He argues that there are at least 4 different kinds of parallel universes lurking out there. Together, these universes comprise everything that exists: the entirety of space, time, matter, energy, information, and the physical laws and constants that describe them. They are arranged such that subsequent levels can be understood to encompass and expand upon previous levels.

A common feature of all four multiverse levels is that the simplest and arguably most elegant theory involves parallel universes by default.

Prominent physicists are divided about whether any other universes exist outside of our own.

Some of them think that the multiverse theory could at least be rendered more plausible, by the existence of dark energy in our universe.

However, others argue that the multiverse is a philosophical notion rather than a scientific hypothesis because it cannot be empirically falsified.

If our universe were merely one of infinitely many, there would be no way to confirm that any of the others are distinct rather than part of an infinite multiverse. In other words, no external observer could ever determine whether his universe was special in the sense that it is exempted from sharing its characteristics with other universes.


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