The incredible physics behind quantum computing


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The incredible physics behind quantum computing

The incredible physics behind quantum computing

While today’s computers—referred to as classical computers—continue to become more and more powerful, there is a ceiling to their advancement due to the physical limits of the materials used to make them. Quantum computing allows physicists and researchers to exponentially increase computation power, harnessing potential parallel realities to do so.

Quantum computer chips are astoundingly small, about the size of a fingernail. Scientists have to not only build the computer itself but also the ultra-protected environment in which they operate. Total isolation is required to eliminate vibrations and other external influences on synchronized atoms; if the atoms become ‘decoherent’ the quantum computer cannot function.

« You need to create a very quiet, clean, cold environment for these chips to work in, » says quantum computing expert Vern Brownell. The coldest temperature possible in physics is -273.15 degrees C. The rooms required for quantum computing are -273.14 degrees C, which is 150 times colder than outer space. It is complex and mind-boggling work, but the potential for computation that harnesses the power of parallel universes is worth the chase.

Check Chris Bernhardt’s book « Quantum Computing for Everyone (MIT Press) » at http://amzn.to/3nSg5a8

By : MICHIO KAKU

VERN BROWNELL

BRIAN GREENE


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